Deadly Tots Project

The Deadly Tots project was funded by the Aboriginal Child Health and Family Strategy (ACYFS) to develop resources that promote the key messages and share the latest information on children's social, emotional and intellectual development with families and communities of Aboriginal children. The resources developed by the Deadly Tots project include: The Love, Yarn, Sing, Read, Play flip chart; A Height Chart; The Love, Yarn, Sing, Read, Play song; Facebook page; You Tube Channel; and the Deadly Tots Website. If you live in Inner West, South East or Northern Sydney to get free copies of the magnetised flip chart and other Deadly Tots resources call Karitane 9794 2348. Organisations working with families in these Sydney regions may order free copies.

Babies are the future Who we need to carry on The traditions that we pass down Must be ones that are very strong Learning is the key To a future that is bright Let us keep moving forward And not ... Continue reading
Ngala Nanga Mai is a Parent Art group based at the La Perouse Aboriginal Health Centre. The group meet twice a week on Tuesday and Thursdays to paint and yarn They bring their kids but The Deli childcare workers provide ... Continue reading
The Deadly Tots team were invited in to meet the Multi Mix Mob and the results were great friendships and a beautiful song written from the hearts of the Multi Mix Mob Guitar Girls . Follow the link to listen ... Continue reading
Bubs emotional, social and intellectual development are all connected. Each one depends on and influences the other. How bub develops depends both on the genes Bub is born with and the experiences Bub has while growing. The first and most ... Continue reading
The Koori Kids Menai Play group helped The Deadly Tots project by yarning with the Project team about what sorts of information parents wanted. They also sent in plenty of photo of their Deadly Koori Kids for the flip chart ... Continue reading

The Deadly Tots project would like to acknowledge and pay respects to the traditional Aboriginal owners of the land on which they work and they would also like to pay their respect to elders past and present.